The Secret Lives of Healers (or, how we met)

September 3, 2009 at 4:28 am | Posted in Captain, Grouping, healing, LotRO, Minstrel | Leave a comment
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A long long time ago, when I was still playing Dark Age of Camelot I think, I read a piece somewhere about how the best healers were those who could chat in group/raid while healing. As a multi-tasking test more than anything else. Since I’m horribly chatty, I took this as gospel and as a validation of the fact I’m just as likely to be chatting as healing someone at any given situation!

So, it shouldn’t surprise anyone to hear that the way me and Hawley met was via chat, during a raid where were were the only healers. Our kin ‘borrowed’ Hawley from our allied kin to boost our minstrel numbers for the 12-man Rift raid in LotRO. I am even relatively sure he offered himself up for this. We didn’t have enough minstrels to regularly go twice a week, and his kin had plenty of healers and weren’t actually raiding as seriously as us. So Hawley became ours for the nights we needed.

Me, I played a minstrel up to 50 so I could also bolster the numbers of real healers. But I quite often went as Captain healer anyway. And of course, we introduced ourselves on the way to the first fight, had a little chat about strategies, who was most likely to die first, what order we tended to heal people, etc etc. Just in way of a professional greeting.

But, by boss no. 2 we’d kind of moved to chit-chat, and jokes. I’ve always chatted to the other healers on raids, during the raids. We share tactics. That’s good. In some MMOs we have to take care of overhealing, so discussion is very important. But, in other cases, it’s just nice to hang out and chat with people who face the same strategic choices and stresses as you.

Let’s face it, we all know healers get yelled at a lot. Whether right or wrong it’s basic human instinct to want to not die! Especially if there’s someone there who can prevent it by pressing a few buttons. But, there are times, when fights are going well.. when healers are really just on stand-by mode. And we can spot those times, and break out of them when needed. In those times, I’d say I generally exchange some kind of chit-chat, mostly via page. Teamspeak makes raidwide chatter easier, but often, in a new raid, the talk needs to be kept down a little. So typing offers me that release. And I was glad to find, in Hawley, a fellow chatterbox.

No-one died unnecessarily on our watch, and we continued our conversations every friday and sunday at the Rift for many months. It helps to be friendly enough to de-brief after a rough fight also, or to reassure that nothing could have gone differently (or discuss how healing could have been better). I chat with most healers I raid with.. sometimes I think it’s just me, but they always join in and seemingly enjoy it! I think it helps build a healer support structure, since the only people that really know how it feels to heal and to be yelled at are the raid healers. And to support one another and be sociable is the main reason I play MMOs. I’ve made a lot of healing friends, and no-one’s ever told me to shut up and get back to healing!

In other games, I have been told off for typing in group while healing, I guess that’s why I page people mostly these days. And because I don’t think my healing suffers in any way from the chatter. I’m no fool, I pick my moments, as do the people I chat to. In fact, we need the behind-the-scenes chat to let off steam. It can be a little stressful, and anything said in a raid in private chat, stays in private chat and is forgotten afterwards. Honest!

Arbitrary

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